You're not alone – Owlet's blog


The daily schedule, predictability, and "me time" records that you held so dear are gone, and your new normal is … challenging. But we want you to know that you are not flying solo. There is a whole community of mamas all over this country (and the world!) Navigating these changes together one day at a time. You're not alone, Mom!

We reached out to five real Owlet moms who are about to manage a new normal without day care, breaks from kiddos, parks or play dates to find out how they handle the changes in their daily lives. We hope their insights remind you that you can do this and that you are not alone.

Danica, mother of three little girls

How do you adapt to this "new normal"?

This is difficult. This is not at all what I had imagined and dreamed of for my next child. I had planned on lots of neighbors games, enjoying parks and warm weather and visiting family & friends. Instead, we get stuck at home alone with a newborn and two toddlers and just try to enjoy the large parts of it without living the way we wish things were.

How has this affected your daily routine?

We have to build some space in our routine that was taken from us. My kids need breaks from our parenting and from each other. We try to create small "dates" about one-on-one time with mom and dad for each of our children, even if it's just a trip to have a drink or escape to a quiet room for some reading together. My husband has been blessed to play a bigger role in our daily lives and it has been fantastic for everyone.

Share some of the highest and lowest levels you have experienced.

It is challenging to struggle with postpartum anxiety / depression when most of your coping mechanisms are impossible – work out at my gym, go to the movies, meet with my husband, take my kids to the playground, girl evenings with my friends. I have felt stuck. But I am also overwhelmed by gratitude because it is the kind of uninterrupted family time I could never have experienced otherwise. Seeing my husband become a father to a new child is my favorite thing and we get so much more out of it than we could have expected.

What advice would you give to other moms right now?

Reach out. Do not keep your frustration, anxiety, depression, anger, sadness and hopelessness to yourself – even if you know it is not rational. Reach out. Tell a friend. Tell your husband or your mom or your neighbor. Shine the light on your darkness and it will decrease.

How to stay connected during this isolation period.

We FaceTime both sets of grandparents almost every day. As a mom, I make text, Marco Polo and social media interactions with my female friends a major priority for my mental health. My book club meets via Zoom this week and I can't wait!

Sara, new mother to a ten-month-old boy

How do you adapt to this "new normal"?

This was our normal: we live in a small studio in New York where our ten-month-old son, Ben, sleeps in a closet that blocks access to our bathroom after he has fallen asleep for the night. His nursery is basically our whole apartment, so it seems that our "new normal" is a huge improvement on his "normal". Our "new normal" is our nephew in Virginia, where Ben sleeps in a package and plays covered by a Slumberpod, next to his dad's makeshift workstation. He has plenty of room to crawl around and cousins ​​to play with every day. Our "new normal" began a month ago, when we heard about the first cases of Covid-19 in the city, and just knew that we couldn't handle a pandemic in such a close neighborhood. Being in a new environment has helped us all to better adapt, at least physically.

How has this affected your daily routine?

Emotionally, I find it difficult to adjust. There are many feelings of disappointment, fear, longing and sometimes anger. I find that I sleep much more, because my body feels heavy and tired of all my emotions, and it makes time to feel that things are going faster. I try to take time out of my worries (which is mainly triggered by any type of scrolling on my phone). When I do, I can think clearly and try to feel things. To be present is a struggle, to be present means that I still have to deal with all the scary things happening in the world. But being present also means focusing on being in the moment with my child as he grows and develops. I do not want to miss these moments with him, not even during the bizarre time in our lives.

Share some of the highest and lowest levels you have experienced.

Low departures always come from far away, at this point. I miss my city, I miss my home, I miss all the plans we had for the immediate future. The low departures also come from within me, and I realize that I have some power to help me through the flames. I always feel that I have to admit my feelings instead of ignoring them. Talking about my struggle with my husband is a balm for my soul. A good shout also helps. The high tasks come from being a mother and having someone to take care of and focus on other than myself. The peaks include watching my son crawl and get mobility and speed. They come from seeing him so happy because he gets more time with his dad than he is used to. They come from his budding friendship with his cousins. They come from unplanned time with the family.

What advice would you give to other moms right now?

My advice to anyone who is going through a difficult adjustment is to know that your feelings are valid and okay. There is no right way to deal with this pandemic, to stay home in isolation, not to have the help and resources needed to raise a family, among other things. You get to know all the things and you should let yourself know them. If being in your emotions becomes too overwhelming, know that there are ways to help you cope. Whether it is online therapy, move your body, focus on others and list things you are grateful for. We will get through this and come out stronger in the end.

Rebbie, new mom to boy

How do you adapt to this "new normal"?

Whether we go for a walk, sit on our patio or stream in a yoga class while he naps (he woke up as soon as I came to savasana, of course), I have found that it has been necessary to get out and be active in reason.

Share some of the highest and lowest levels you have experienced.

We had a small cookie dough left in our fridge and instead of throwing it away I decided to bake it. Yes, I baked a single cookie for my husband and I would share. When little things are all you have, celebrate the little things.

I'm not one who thinks there is any urgency to get back to the clothes before pregnancy, but one day I had to put on something other than jogging. Wearing jeans and a blouse was a fun way to feel part of my life was made up, if only for a day.

Paper leave was not long enough. Having dad at home to sneak down and keep our boy in breaks or between meetings has been such a silver lining.

What advice would you give to other moms right now?

There is more confusion and fear right now than any other time in my life. But when the little guy smiles, everyone feels right in the world.

Katie, new mom to a boy

How do you adapt to this "new normal"?

I try not to be too harsh on myself. I've also said to myself that it's okay not to be okay right now. My husband and I both work full time now and take care of Oliver, our eighth month. Our grandson cannot take care of him under San Francisco's protection on the spot. It is challenging to balance work, life and take care of Oliver, but I have seen so many positive things come out of this scary time. Oliver has been my happy place in all the uncertainty. He wakes up with a gigantic smile on his face every morning, completely innocent and unaware of what's going on in the world. I get to see him grow and learn new things (he started to crawl!), And I know that when this is over, and I have to go back to the office, it will be so hard not to see him time. So even though the days are tough and uncertain, I try to appreciate this time at home with him and do the best I can.

I am fortunate to work for a company that values ​​being a working parent and says I should put my family first through all this. I also realize how happy I am to be able to work from home.

Share some of the highest and lowest levels you have experienced.

As a new mom, I constantly feel that I am failing or that I am not doing anything right. I recently decided that I was doing the best I could, and that's OK. When I swing Oliver to sleep at night or read him a bed at bedtime and we snuggle, I know things will be okay.

What advice would you give to other moms right now?

Don't worry about what everyone else is doing. Do what works for you and your child. You are the best mom for your baby! You are exactly what they need. You are doing amazing!

Cherise, new mom to twin boys

How do you adapt to this "new normal"?

Due to the strict hospital regulations and the increased concern for COVID-19, my husband was unable to attend the birth of our identical boys and unfortunately was unable to visit any of them in the NICU (he has had a cold with a residual cough – NOT COVID- 19). These were both our first experiences of having a child and my husband has been by my side all the time and attended every doctor's meeting while I was pregnant. It was very hard emotionally for both of us when he couldn't attend the birth and it was also very hard for us not to be able to share the special moment of meeting our children together. He had to wait two weeks to meet and hold one of his children for the first time and he still has not met his child's twin brother because he is currently still in the NICU.

When I enter the hospital, I have to take my temperature, check in at both the reception and the desk at the NICU, and also have a mask the whole time I am there. My visits to the NICU consist of taking the baby's temperature, changing diapers, practicing breastfeeding on their own and with breastfeeding consultant, bottle feeding, burping, pumping, skin to skin, bathing, photo-taking and regular facial stimulation with dad since this has been the only way he has had to make contact with their boys since they were born.

Share some of the highest and lowest levels you have experienced.

Högsta has had two perfect and overall healthy baby boys to join us, much less LA traffic (which means a quick commute to the hospital), a wonderful NICU staff of doctors, nurses and therapists to take good care of our boys when I have not been able to be there, my husband, Roury, met his baby for the first time and have only been able to cuddle, love and kiss them together. Some downsides have been my husband who could not attend the birth and could not meet or spend any time with them in the NICU, as well as trying to balance my time between the child in the NICU and the child at home, and of course … the lack of sleep.

Our daily routine consists of pumping 3-4 hours a day, feeding, pinching, changing diapers, putting down the baby, sleeping, pumping, finding time to eat, spending as much time as I can with a twin brother and then coming home and do it again. But late at night, when the lights are dim and the fireplace is lit, and it's just you and your child snuggling in your arms, you know that even with all the turmoil in the world and a global pandemic, everything is fine in your home.

Annie, mother of two boys

How do you adapt to this "new normal"?

This new normal has been the hardest for my toddler, Winston. How do you explain why "you can't play on the playground" to such a small child? He also turns 3 next week. People are probably going through harder things than having a birthday party without family or friends, but it still breaks my heart a bit.

Share some of the highest and lowest levels you have experienced.

The best part of this experience is spending time with my kiddos. I've tried to be more focused on them when I'm at home. I feel so lucky that I am quarantining with babies because they keep me behind the negative news. I'm so taken care of them that I hardly have time to worry.

What advice would you give to other moms right now?

This quarantine period has really given me a deeper appreciation for my family and friends as well as life experiences. I can't wait to take my kids to the zoo again! To take them to see their grandmother in California. To take them swimming and to movies. I hope to teach them gratitude for the little things in life when this is over.